Was Ontario’s 100 year old Mothers’ Allowance the first incarnation of the CERB?

The first report of Ontario’s Mothers’ Allowance Commission was delivered to the Ontario Government on October 31, 1921[1]. Copies are only available at the Ryerson Library and Ontario’s Legislative library so I scanned it in for the convenience of all. See footnote 1 below. It’s a fascinating report and I encourage all readers to download it and consume it voraciously. The sections on the travails of field workers visiting applicants and recipients are really quite gripping. They narrate walking miles in blinding snowstorms, riding the rails and making visits on horseback. But telling that tale is not why I am writing this blog today. I am writing because the Mothers’ Allowances - that were only given to Widows at first -may have been – at least in part -the first…
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Stop voting for the illegal world you don’t want! A history lesson on the legalization of consumable alcohol, speakeasies and rooming houses

 "Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it." Georges Santayana The life of Reason; 1906 Think for a second what it means to be a tenant living in premises that municipal bylaws hold to be illegal. You have no rights and you have no voice because – according to law – you shouldn’t be living there in the first place. This is the way that some rooming house operators profit from illegality. And for some Toronto City Councillors, that’s where the issue ends. When they vote to keep rooming houses illegal, they are voting for tenants to live illegally. But there is much we can learn from past examples of illegal real estate. Like speakeasies during the Prohibition era in Canada, rooming houses (multi-tenant accommodation) share a common past.…
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A new Covid-19 variant: the ‘pandemic benefit confiscation variant’

Unlike new and more infectious variants of the Covid-19 virus, there is a new Covid-19 variant affecting pandemic benefits in Canada. It has been named the ‘pandemic benefit confiscation variant’. This variant causes a spike to latch onto the bank accounts, purses and wallets of unsuspecting pandemic response beneficiaries. It mostly attacks the benefits provided under the Canada Emergency Response Benefit (CERB) and the Canada Recovery Benefit (CRB) although it has been known to attack other pandemic benefits. Symptoms Infected people experience: the disappearance of pandemic benefits,increased clawbacks of funds that they continue to receive as well as funds no longer received,repayment requests for funds received from the CRA; andnotices of termination of eviction moratoriums and rent freezes from provinces and territories Outcomes Researchers note that their work is still…
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Get rid of irrelevant attributions in ‘word-salad’ statements

Leonard Mlodinow notes in The Drunkard’s Walk, that two facts can be correct at the same time where one is relevant and the other is irrelevant [1].  In this sense, there can be errors of relevance where an argument using the wrong base rate is not incorrect but has little meaning in a chosen context. Daniel Kahneman refers to this as ‘denominator neglect’[2]. Another instance of irrelevance occurs where there is no base rate and where denominator neglect is not strictly present.  For example, something that is attributable to the whole is irrelevant because it has no meaning, not because it is strictly breaks a base rate rule. Common examples use the thought experiment of 'everything being green'. If there was only one colour and that colour was 'green' then…
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“It could have been me” Why rooming houses must be legalized – Guest blog from Yvonne Yuan

In the middle of a mid-summer night in June 2013, I was forced out of a rooming house.  I had nowhere to go. I was an 18-year-old sophomore at the University of Toronto, Scarborough campus. Two girls I knew had found the house and invited me to live there. Judging from the outside, it was a perfectly maintained detached house that sat near an intersection within walking distance to the campus.  I shared a washroom with 2 other girls and a shower with 7 other girls. The basement also housed more tenants and all of us shared a kitchen and three fridges. My rent was $450 per month. I paid cash. We each signed one-year contracts with the landlord that still had 2 months to go. Then something unexpected happened.…
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Am I still worth it? Self-worth and worthiness in the age of Covid-19

“The most influential books are always those that are not read.” - Michael Dunlop Young [1] “The ideas of economists and political philosophers, both when they are right and when they are wrong are more powerful than is commonly understood. Indeed, the world is ruled by little else. Practical men, who believe themselves to be quite exempt from any intellectual influences, are usually slaves of some defunct economist.” - John Maynard Keynes [2]   Self-worth and Worthiness are attributes we all understand but they have been undergoing much scrutiny as richer countries believe themselves to emerging from the Covid-19 pandemic. Millions of people got sick and died. Our long term care facilities had catastrophic experiences leading most of us to believe that, as a society, we do not sufficiently value…
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A romantic tale of inadvertent discovery

“There’s something happening here; but what it is ain’t exactly clear” - Buffalo Springfield, For What It’s Worth “If you don't know where you are going, you'll end up someplace else.”  - Yogi Berra The Neighbourhood Change Research Partnership has published a presentation on the correlation between Covid-19 infection patterns and households with mutually dependent adults[1]: COVID-19 & Mutually Dependent Populations in the Toronto Census Metropolitan Area. This study used custom datasets to illustrate how higher household sizes containing mutually dependent adults correlate closely to the levels of Covid-19 infections. No other correlation to Covid-19 even comes close, except for the combination of overcrowded conditions and mutually dependent households -- a correlation we also explored. If we are right – and we have very good evidence to support our conclusions…
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Thirty six years since an Ontario PC Government last raised social assistance rates

It’s early 1985 and Premier Bill Davis is on his way to retirement. He has been Premier since 1971 and his party has been in power for 42 consecutive years ever since Liberal Mitch Hepburn lost to the PC’s in 1943. Davis called for a youth movement but the party leadership was won by Frank Miller, a man who was 2 years older than Davis. Miller assumed the mantle on July 2, 1985 and lost the next election a little more than 4 months later on November 22, 1985. A coalition of Liberals and NDP members formed government under David Peterson. No one in Ontario had experienced anything other than progressive conservative governments since World War II when George Drew narrowly defeated an upstart CCF, the forerunner of today’s NDP.…
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New personal tax deduction wrongly favours the well-off

I have to admit to thinking that a columnist for the Toronto Star was misinformed when I read that there would be a new personal tax deduction of $400 for employees working from home. As Rosa Saba noted in the Toronto Star: “Now all employees who worked from home more than half the time over at least four consecutive weeks during 2020 due to the pandemic will be eligible. As well, the government clarified that eligible employees can claim $2 for each day they worked from home, up to a maximum of $400. Employees claiming expenses this way will not need to track their expenditures, provide receipts, or submit a form signed by their employer.[1]” I thought to myself: that’s funny; most government of Canada tax credits announced over the…
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Happy Birthday? Anxious pandemic times for people living in poverty

About a year ago, my father passed away. This left me to deal with all the things one must do to put a loved one’s affairs in order: many visits to Service Canada; letters and phone calls to Veterans’ Affairs; memos to lawyers’ offices and to a funeral home to procure original documents. No scans are allowed. Every piece of paper must be an original. I can only wonder what it’s like during a pandemic when there are more deaths and offices are closed. I can imagine that paperwork for births must be just as challenging although more joyous. But there are a whole set of other obstacles for low income people who would otherwise celebrate important birthdays during a pandemic. Let’s think about a couple of them. Turning 18…
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